The Tales of Beedle the Bard–J.K. Rowling

Can you even believe that someone such as I has never read this book in its entirety? 

Almost as insane as I still haven’t seen Fantastic Beasts even though I own two copies….and I read the book. 

I will 100% use this book as a story tale basis when I have kids. It was so sweet and adorable. 

I need more J.K. Rowling books, I always miss her writing so much and love stepping back into it and her world whenever it comes around. 

Even just seeing that font relaxes me.

Sigh.

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Rebecca of Sunnybrook Farm–Kate Douglas Wiggin

Grain of salt here: This is a children’s book. And I usually don’t like childrens books that are classics just because I find them quite boring and like nothing happens. (Generational gap, I suppose.)

This was no exception. It’s about a little girl who is lovely, but a bit of a show off. She is sent to a farm to live with her aunts and is constantly in trouble for being…well an extrovert.

Hurts my feminist heart to see a little girls life being snuffed out and stuck in a box. No worries though, everyone ends up dead and she gets an inheritance to make life better.

I just couldn’t get on board with this book. I was reading it to my little cousin as part of our nap time ritual (at the time) and it put us both to sleep.

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Harry Potter and The Cursed Child–J.K. Rowling, John Thorne, Jack Tiffany

I wish I had seen this in play form. This was so interesting and cool! Even though JK Rowling didn’t write the play itself, she did approve of this and it’s based on a short story she wrote.

I missed my people. This is the only universe that’s ever felt completely like home to me.

Including this one we currently live in. Being a human is so boring sometimes.

So to be able to revisit it and see old characters, and see all our kids grown up and having an adventure was really fun, even if it was super heartbreaking at points.

This is about Harry as an adult and what’s going on with his children, as the synopsis concludes: Past and present collide and things get really super bananas.

Okay. They didn’t say that word for word, but here we are.

I really enjoyed this, for obvious reasons. It was quick to read given that the format is in that of a play and it’s for the characters to learn their lines.

I genuinely hope they make this into a mini series or something, that would be so cool.

Constant vigilance!

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Grandpa’s Great Escape–David Walliams

Given the title of this book I thought it would be far more fun than it was. It was actually kind of terrifying for kids I think. Or at least for the 4 year old I read it to.

I had to keep editing a little because it deals with Alzheimers and really rough treatment of such patients. (Only because the operators of the facility were evil.)

I would like to see a book for kids where caretakers or nurses in this situation weren’t portrayed as evil. That would be nice.

Overall, this was a good book to learn about what is happening to your grandparent/loved one and helped explain Alzheimers in a nice and thoughtful way for the most part. That aspect wasn’t too scary. So if that runs in your family or you are having a hard time explaining to your kids, this might help.

Or make it worse. Depends on the kid, I suspect.

I didn’t like it that much. But, hello, not my age group.

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The Jungle Book–Rudyard Kipling

We all know what The Jungle Book is about yes? Okay.

I really liked it, but I don’t know that I should’ve been reading it to my little cousin. There’s a lot of carnage in here. Like a lot.

It even had a drawing in there of a dead/dying animal.

It was not okay.

However, it was a good book, maybe more for kids 10 and up though. But only because of that drawing.

As always with jungle themed books, it made me want to run away and live there Swiss Family Robinson style.

If only a wolf would adopt me.

Definitely a decent classic to read for sure.

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Constant vigilance!

Tales of a Fourth Grade Nothing–Judy Blume

This book is dear to me only because I read it to my little cousin and he not only enjoyed the antics, but it kind of reminded me that he is an extra special little guy.

In that he’s articulate and does not throw tantrums the likes of this kids little brother Fudge.

In fact, I found that some of this was unrealistic (obviously, it’s a kids book made for entertainment not realism.) and didn’t show Fudge being a particularly verbal kid.

BUT I have to remember that not every kid is a little sass-pot like my cousin and that he is in fact the exception to the rule. (He’s a clever little twerp who told me just last week “I am capable of walking, thank you.” and to his sister when he was asked to do something “I am not available for that.” haha He’s four and amazing.)

This book also gave us the lovely phrase “Eat it or wear it.” to which I say whenever we are in an argument at lunch time and it helps us to ease our frustration with each other.

It was a cute book, definitely good to read to or with a kid. (Nothing like the weirdo Roald Dahl books that bordered on inappropriate constantly.)

Constant vigilance.

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Charlie and the Chocolate Factory–Roald Dahl

Contrary to what I’ve been writing about Roald Dahl’s books on here (those were the questionable ones to be sure) I do actually enjoy his writing. It is not really for toddlers, but I should’ve probably knew they weren’t going to be. My bad.

However, this book was totally lovely! Just as I remember it.

Funny story: One of my cousins that I look after, his school makes it mandatory to go to the library (as they should) and one day they were having a Free Books day for the old books to leave the school. Everyone got to take home whatever they wanted. He chose ‘Charlie and the Chocolate Factory’. It was busted and old and has an old school hardcover.

He thought it was really cool that there was even a library card in the back with all these peoples names on them.

I read through them and realized not only did I start recognizing the names of some of the students, but I recognized their handwriting! Some of the names it was hard not to given that they had written down their quite obvious nicknames. And in between all those was a name written in in pencil:

“Allison”. Full with the funny ‘A’ I used to do and my attempt at cursive.

I had read that book when I was his age and now he was holding a piece of my history. How weird is that? Weird and cool.

Anyway, THIS is a safe book to read to your kids. It’s just as sweet as we remember and quirky too. Definitely pass this one down, or snuggle up with your kids for it.

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