Worlds of Ink and Shadow–Lena Coakley

I was having a really hard time reading anything for a very long time. (And if you noticed, also writing anything beyond “Good book. Must read. Gronk loves rock.”.) 

But this book was so fucking fantastic. 

It’s based off of the Bronte family and intersperses their real life history with an interesting notion of jumping in and out of time and through their stories to meet their characters and rule the worlds. 

It was soooo well written and an interesting premise. And I learned so much about the Brontes! 

Like that there was a brother. Who knew? haha. 

And that the facts the author used are verified. At least by Wikipedia. 

Constant vigilance!

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The Dinner–Herman Koch

This book is about two brothers and their families. The two brothers and their wives gather for dinner in a fancy pants restaurant to discuss an issue that arises with their sons.

The writing was good even though it was translated (kudos to whoever did that without making it sound stilted and odd) from Dutch and the story was intriguing enough to keep me reading.

However (potential spoilers ahead) there were certain parts that I was extremely annoyed with. Like when an author decides that he’s not going to let the main character tell us some things because they aren’t crucial and they wouldn’t make a difference but then talk about how it got him fired from his job, or not tell you what made his wife sick, or what mental disadvantage (or neurosis) he has and might be passing onto his son while a doctor tells him that if they had amniotic testing back in the day his parents likely would’ve aborted him.

Don’t line it up without hitting it, you know? Just tell me! That’s your job as a writer. It’s your job to tell the WHOLE story. Sure, you can be mysterious and withholding at points, hello, it’s called foreshadowing. But don’t leave things out just to annoy someone without the end result of actually telling the audience what you were foreshadowing!

What in the hell Herman!

Overall, this book was good, quick read, but I don’t think I’d read it again in the future. Gave me some things to mull over (ie. What would I do if my future children accidentally murdered a homeless woman.).

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Book Hunting

Today I wrangled my mom and little sister into going to a giant book sale in Elora, it wasn’t really hard since they were also very excited about it. I came home with a whopping 31 books! For 33 dollars. Winner winner chicken dinner.

Thank you to my best friend who told me about this sale that happens every year because now we are marking it on our calendars as a ‘Must Do’ every year! Not that we “need” more books, but just that we effin’ love a good bargain especially when it comes to our collections.

Thank you Elora for my new stack of Agatha Christies! I will be having a great mysterious summer!

Here’s what I grabbed:

Frankenstein–Mary Shelley, The Taking–Dean Koontz, Dolores Clairborne–Stephen King, The Pilot’s Wife–Anite Shreve, In The Woods–Tana French, Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf?–Edward Albee, Three Gothic Novels (which I think I already have a copy), The Burning Wire–Jeffery Deaver, The Memoirs of Sherlock Holmes–Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, Leaven of Malice–Robertson Davies, Dubliners–Jame Joyce, Girl with Green Eyes–Edna O’Brien, Mrs. Dalloway–Virginia Woolf, Grave Secrets–Kathy Reichs (I know I know, masochist!), Big Girl Panties–Stephanie Evanovich, and Agatha Christies: The Secret of Chimneys, The Man in the Brown Suit, The Secret Adversary, Taken at the Flood, The Mirror Crack’d from Side to Side, The Boomerang Clue, Third Girl, At Bertram’s Hotel, The Body in the Library, Hallowe’en Party, The Pale Horse, They Came to Baghdad, and the Adventure of the Christmas Pudding. Not to mention Great Stories by Arthur Conan Doyle, Madame De Pompadour–Nancy Mitford and Doctor Zhivago–Boris Pasternak.

Ton of fun! Can’t wait for next year! I better get reading!!!

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The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo–Stieg Larsson

I had a problem with this book. Not that I didn’t like the writing or even the characters, my problem was that I just didn’t care. I wasn’t completely wrapped up into their world and excited to read this book once I got started. Everyone (and this happens a lot with books that people tell me I HAVE TO READ IT WAS SO AMAZING BLAHSJDDKJSFKJSDHFKJHDFKJHDSFH FANGIRL SQUEEEEEE) was so up my butt about this book the whole time I was reading it that I just wanted to get rid of it. I loved Lisbeth, I wanted more of her story, I could care less about Mikael and his troubles with the magazine and the financial world and the crime solving, whatever.

All I wanted to know was her back-story and life, and it was like Stieg kept refusing me what I wanted! And then (SPOILER) she gets raped.

Sigh. I’m never going to see the point of adding in a rape in a story, ever. I know it happens in real life, I know it’s meant for shock and awe, and to make you sympathize with certain people in stories. But I will NEVER be able to read a scene like that all the way through without having to put the book down, cry, and try not to think about how this is somebody’s reality somewhere. I don’t read books to be put into real situations. I read to escape reality and when things get a little too real I need to get out of there.

I do have to say: Her revenge was the most amazing thing I’ve ever read in my entire life. I would NEVER do that to another human being no matter what they did to me, but I applaud her. I’m going to read the rest eventually because I like Lisbeth and I was promised more of her life than of Mikaels, so hopefully the rest of the series is good.

Otherwise, I wasn’t a huge fan of this book (even if the rape didn’t happen) and declared ‘No thanks’ on the other books.

We will see, for now I’m working on too many projects.

Constant vigilance.

Gone Girl–Gillian Flynn

SPOILER ALERT: DO NOT READ PAST THIS POINT.

 I’ve been hearing about this book forever it seems. Everyone was telling me how great and crazy it was and that I, of all people, needed to read it.

 People seriously kept saying that: You, of all people, need to read it.

 I’m assuming because I’m a voracious reader and love a good plot twist. So I have no shame in saying that this book:

 3/4s of it was boring.

Bomb dropped

 Okay, so something has been happening to me lately where I’ve been reading so much that I just want authors to get to the point. Why am I reading this book? Why is the lead up so long? What’s the matter with writers that there is just action on top of action in any of the books I’m reading?

 Winnie-the-Pooh managed to shock me, so why shouldn’t books that are labeled as thrillers and mysteries?

 Be careful what you wish for.

 The last ¼ of this book was bomb after bomb of shock and awe! The funny thing is: I predicted what was going to happen and it still knocked my goddamn socks off. And for sincerity sake here’s a picture of the conversation with my friend Marie from when I read it:

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Here’s hoping Ben Affleck kills it in the movie version and they don’t bastardize the book.

Constant vigilance!

Tell No One–Harlan Coben

As you may have noticed I don’t write these directly after I read them anymore. I’m lazy. I write a bunch in one sitting and pretend like I was writing them all along. Which tends to lead me to forgetting what some of these books were actually about.

 Now, I gave this book a 2 out of 5 stars on my GoodReads… Which means I hated it and wanted to kick it down a well. I don’t think I’ve ever put a 1 star on anything because I know how much work it takes to write a book, even a crappy one.

 This book was about (wait, while I read the synopsis on GoodReads) a man whose wife disappears and then he’s getting cryptic messages 8 years later that sound like it’s his wife talking to him. (Right, now I remember. Sort of.)

 I’m not going to say Don’t Bother, but if I don’t remember most of it, then I’m likely not going to read it again. I’m pretty sure I actually gave it away. …

 If you like predictable “Thrillers” give it a try.

 But you’d probably enjoy Gone Girl better.

Misery–Stephen King

I’m sorry I kept you waiting so long for this review. I put things in order of how I read them and I’m not always up to date just because I basically have a backlog of things I read in case of such books like Game of Thrones where it takes me weeks and weeks to read them. This way you’ll always have something from me to you to read about.

            But now! MISERY.

You read my reactions, you know that this book scared the hell out of me. Not in a scary like terrified for my own life kind of way, but more like stressing me the hell out. I FELT so much with this book that I barely got through it because I kept having to put it down and just go “Aaaahhh fuuuuuuuck.” Every other page. I was so convinced that he wasn’t going to get out of there! And at every turn Annie had him pinned down or another scheme to torture him.

I just can’t believe that this was in a persons head. I want to find Stephen King and give him a bear hug because this guy just…just…you know? Just. *exhales *

Great writing, great story, great everything and its mom.

Don’t read it alone.

Oh right, the plot. I should probably tell you a little more about that in case you haven’t read it.

    Paul Sheldon is a famous writer who gets into a car accident, then Annie finds him, sticks him in her trunk before anyone finds him, and “nurses” him back to health while he writes a new Misery book because she didn’t like how he had ended his series. Gets him addicted to painkillers.

Every writers worst nightmare is a crazed fan who would torture them with their own work. Annie takes it to the next degree where she leaves Paul with his busted up legs and pumps him full of drugs and then does things to torture him into writing.

Again, don’t read it alone.