Review Dump

Hey there Sports Fans!

So I realize that I’ve been M.I.A. constantly. It’s just who I am now.

I’m so far behind that most of these are from LAST SUMMER. What. On. Earth. So I’m  going to just dump a handful of short reviews on you.

The Bookstore—Deborah Meyler 

This book didn’t get a fair shake. I read it after Simon Vs. The Homosapiens Agenda and could NOT get into it after SUCH a good book. 

Maybe if I read it after a lacklustre book I would’ve liked it more?

It’s about a young woman working in a bookstore who gets dumped just as she was about to tell her boyfriend that she is pregnant. 

It was an okay book. 

deb

Dumb Witness—Agatha Christie 

‘Dumb Witness’ is about an old spinster who falls down the stairs and nearly croaks after she appears to slip on her dogs ball. 

Talk about my future, am I right? 

She is trying to solve who is trying to off her for her money. 

As always with Agatha Christie, a good whodunit! 

Sometimes when I read her books I’m like OOOOKKKAAAAY I GET IT. JUST TELL ME WHO DID IT. 

But this one held my attention and I liked the ending. 

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The Bluest Eyes—Toni Morrison 

I hadn’t read a Toni Morrison book before this. I was told to read “Beloved’ because it was AMAZING. 

And somehow I got it into my brain that it was a sequel to another book that I didn’t have and didn’t read it and ended up reading The Bluest Eyes. 

Which I’m glad I did! 

I love her style of writing, I loved the character of Pecola, and I just wanted everything to be okay for her in the end. 

It makes me sad to read about people wishing away their features or wishing they had other features to make them more beautiful. 

I want to protect all the kids in the world from the world and what it thinks beauty is.

When I reality, we are ALL beautiful in our own individual ways. 

And I think Toni Morrison did SUCH a beautiful job with this narrative and I really enjoyed reading about lives like her characters who are so different from what I grew up with and what I even sometimes know today. 

It’s a book that’s good for learning things about the world and what’s what. 

toni

The Screwtape Letters—C.S. Lewis

My entire life I thought of C.S. Lewis as the guy who wrote Narnia and kids books and that was that. 

I’m really glad I got to know more of his bibliography as an adult because, here’s something I bet you didn’t see coming: 

He didn’t just write kids books. 

WHAT. 

I know. 

The Screwtape Letters is about two devils writing each other letters. 

It was interesting and cool to read letters where things clearly happened OUTSIDE of the letters that were barely mentioned. 

It was like reading real letters between two people and I liked that. 

It made me really think about the devil on my shoulder. 

And how little by little the devil can take us down, starting with something so small.

Interesting read. 

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Never Have Your Dog Stuffed—Alan Alda

I was going to give this book away before reading it. 

Eventually I did, to my dad, but I read it first.

This book surprised me. I found it kind of boring at first, but as his story went on I got more invested in him. 

Not just as an actor, but as a human being. It was really cool to see where he came from, how his relationships with parents were, and it was so full of sage advice. 

I ended up really appreciating him. 

I’m glad I didn’t shelve this book any longer or put it in the “Never gonna finish reading that” pile where I was determined it would end up in the beginning.

alda

Sliding Into Home—Kendra Wilkinson

Where to start with this book? 

It was…exactly what you thought it was going to be. 

Bubbly, pink, and just okay. 

Kendra was a Playboy bunny who was recruited very young and spills the beans on things like feuds in the Playmate House, and talks about her sex life with Hugh Hefner. 

Which to me (and her actually) sounds pretty gross because it was like a revolving door. 

She was sweet, honest, and had only really nice to things to say about Hugh. 

Which. *shrug*

I don’t suggest this book to be honest because it was a fluff book that in the long term of life: doesn’t matter. 

Brutal, but really, what was I expecting? 

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They Do it With Mirrors–Agatha Christie

I like the simplicity of Agatha Christies writing while also the whole “whodunit” nature of her books.

It was a simpler time when she wrote, so it’s understandable that I would be like “HAHA I know who did it!” When I’ve been raised to mistrust certain characters and been thrown off by the likes of Joss Whedon, George R. R. Martin, and that damn Gone Girl book and Before I Go to Sleep.

Psychological thriller this is not.

However, it was an okay book given that I understand that at the time, she was writing for the mystery aspect and trying to throw people off. She does a good job.

It’s about a home that is a rehabilitation centre for delinquents and someone ends up dead.

Interesting read if you are looking for fancy talk and a good mystery to curl up with in the fall.

agatha

Book Hunting

Today I wrangled my mom and little sister into going to a giant book sale in Elora, it wasn’t really hard since they were also very excited about it. I came home with a whopping 31 books! For 33 dollars. Winner winner chicken dinner.

Thank you to my best friend who told me about this sale that happens every year because now we are marking it on our calendars as a ‘Must Do’ every year! Not that we “need” more books, but just that we effin’ love a good bargain especially when it comes to our collections.

Thank you Elora for my new stack of Agatha Christies! I will be having a great mysterious summer!

Here’s what I grabbed:

Frankenstein–Mary Shelley, The Taking–Dean Koontz, Dolores Clairborne–Stephen King, The Pilot’s Wife–Anite Shreve, In The Woods–Tana French, Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf?–Edward Albee, Three Gothic Novels (which I think I already have a copy), The Burning Wire–Jeffery Deaver, The Memoirs of Sherlock Holmes–Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, Leaven of Malice–Robertson Davies, Dubliners–Jame Joyce, Girl with Green Eyes–Edna O’Brien, Mrs. Dalloway–Virginia Woolf, Grave Secrets–Kathy Reichs (I know I know, masochist!), Big Girl Panties–Stephanie Evanovich, and Agatha Christies: The Secret of Chimneys, The Man in the Brown Suit, The Secret Adversary, Taken at the Flood, The Mirror Crack’d from Side to Side, The Boomerang Clue, Third Girl, At Bertram’s Hotel, The Body in the Library, Hallowe’en Party, The Pale Horse, They Came to Baghdad, and the Adventure of the Christmas Pudding. Not to mention Great Stories by Arthur Conan Doyle, Madame De Pompadour–Nancy Mitford and Doctor Zhivago–Boris Pasternak.

Ton of fun! Can’t wait for next year! I better get reading!!!

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Three Blind Mice–Agatha Christie

I’m not going to lie to you: I don’t remember much of this book. I’m not a short story person. I’m just not. And when they have ridiculous murders and things like that I’m really not into it. Which is sad because I really thought that I would like Agatha Christie’s stuff.

            It’s kind of like meeting your hero and finding out they are a bit of a douchebag. I just found out that a writer that I thought I would love doesn’t inspire me much and isn’t a complete genius. Which really troubles me. I’m sure that I will find eventually one that I absolutely adore, but I’m not really into the “Whodunnit” kind of thing right now so I think that maybe in the future I’ll love something else of hers.

   This one starts out with a murder in a hotel, people are bitches, there’s a snowstorm, everyone thinks it was someone else and then it ….

Oh my God. Just as I’m writing about it I’m remembering what I read. THIS short story I liked because the ending blew my mind.

This just goes to show you that I shouldn’t review books months after reading them.

The rest of the short stories in there weren’t the greatest, but this one and the Tape Measure Murder one were pretty good.

I think I need to write “constant vigilance” on my bookshelf to remind myself to write these right after I read them.

But I can guarantee that things like Divergent and Stephen King books would just be a lot of screaming.

Murder at the Vicarage–Agatha Christie

My first Agatha Christie! This book selection is brought to you by…guess: Dun dun dun dun dun dun dun whoooooeeeeoooooooooooo.

That was supposed to be the musical intro to Doctor Who, but I failed at it.

Weeeell, not really. Weeeelll, I could quote Doctor Who all day. But I will stop and tell you just one thing about this book: it was fantastic! (Gotcha.)

      It’s quite obviously about a murder that happened inside of a vicarage. It’s also my first Miss Marple book, and I was kind of confused at first because I thought that Miss Marple was a young lady. Turns out, not so much. She’s an old lady who could basically be 007 in that she has amazing spy qualities and she could also be Sherlock Holmes since she has some serious deductive reasoning chops. What I thought was really weird about this though, was that she wasn’t the main character…

The main character was the vicar and he was trying to figure out who killed Colonel Protheroe, the town d-bag that everyone hated. Miss Marple just kind of pops up every once in awhile and talks things out with the vicar.

     Odd, but interesting! I like when books that aren’t what I thought turn out to be great anyway. Looking forward to many more books by her.

…I didn’t tell you why the Doctor is sponsoring this post did I? For all my non-Whovians, he met her (Agatha Christie) and helped her solve a murder. Or she helped him. Or Donna just yelled a lot and they stared at her…

Allons-y!

Book Hunting